Outtakes make videos more fun

Updated May, 13, 2019: I wrote this article almost five years ago. And half a decade later, the sentiment is pretty much still the same. Outtakes DO make videos more fun. A funny stare, someone falling down or my all time favorite – someone stammering over a line are all good moments to insert in your video to simply make people laugh and make you as the video creator more memorable.

However, back when I wrote this article, copyright notices on YouTube, Instagram and Facebook were hit and miss and not many people, including me, took them that serious. We should.

Someone spends years of talent, money and effort to create a musical track and in my humble opinion, they should be compensated for it. Lucky for us in 2019 there are a ton of ways to figure out what you can use and what you should use for your video accompaniments.

Here are three ways I like to source music for my videos.

  1. Search the YouTube Audio Library for royalty free music to use in your videos. I used to avoid this service like the plague. But lately, it has gotten substantially better. The music offered royalty free sounds like legitimate music that would be used in a big YouTuber’s latest travel video.

 2. I personally recommend Epidemic Sound. I pay a monthly fee to their service and am able to use it for personal projects as well as client based projects. The fee I pay is a little bit higher than the $15 per month for a YouTube creator wanting to use the music solely for his or her channel. $15 per month for such high quality music is an absolute no brainer.

 3. On few occasions, I have just needed a beat or repetitive loop to play in the background of my videos and for that I’ll often jump on Garage Band and quickly tap out something that sounds good. The pros on using Garage Band is that the app comes free on any Mac, iPad or iPhone. The cons are that the software takes some getting used to and the interface definitely has a learning curve. But, my 11 year old constantly makes amazing sounds and tracks on the app, so surely you could too.

THE IMPORTANCE OF MUSIC FOR YOUR OUTTAKE OR BLOOPER REEL

If you’re making a video of your past experiences, whether it was a guys trip to Vegas or just a fun outing with your kids, a bloopers or outtakes reel at the end helps add a little fun to the mix.

Should you use the song over and over? It depends, really. If you’re trying to create a lasting intro and outro to a video series then sure…use the same song. Television shows do it all the time. But (in my opinion) for a “stand-alone” unique video, after a particular song is used, it becomes unique to that slice of video and just doesn’t feel right to use it again.

Related Video Content:  Check out my YouTube page to see my videos and what music I use.

Of course, there are exceptions to every rule and this particular song is a great one for a bloopers or outtakes reel.  I have used it on multiple occasions and it always works great.  This song was featured at the beginning of the Las Vegas TV series (2003-2008) starring Josh Duhamel, James Caan and Vanessa Marcil.

This is a remix of Elvis’ “A Little Less Conversation” and it is spot on. The quirkiness of how the J.X.L. Radio Edit Remix is presented allows for massive amounts of interpretation on how you want to make your transitions.

Using the YouTube Audio Library, you can check what published music tracks can be legally used in your videos. I don’t go this route anymore. I source all of my music from Epidemic Sound. However, I checked the usability of “A Little Less Conversation”. You can use it as long as you’re not trying to monetize the video and also it will be blocked in 8 countries. Why? I don’t know, but what that means is that your video will not play in those locals.

So, if you’re trying to reach people in: Ghana, Kenya, Nigeria, South Africa, Switzerland, Tanzania, Uganda, Zimbabwe you’re out of luck.

Surely, take a listen to this track and I think you will agree that Elvis Remastered is a perfect choice for a remastered song to help add depth and some humor to the end of your latest video production.

Go Make Something!